Nanny State Doesn’t Want People Texting While They Drive

Nanny state thinks it should interfere with free choice of drivers doing what they feel like doing. Once again the nanny staters want to discourage free people from doing what they see fit to do just because they may kill themselves or others.

Sure texting while driving endangers the driver, their passengers and anyone else on the road with them. Sure many deaths and critical injuries have resulted from texting while driving.

We have known drinking with driving and talking on a cell phone while driving endangers ourselves and others for a long time. Still, people choose to drink and drive or choose to use talk on the phone while driving. Those choosing to do so know they are risking their lives, their passengers lives and those on the road with them. Yet millions do it anyway. If we wanted nanny state protections from deathly risks we could choose to not take foolish risks.

And sure texting is even more dangers that hands free phone calls or driving drunk but why does the nanny state have to get involved? Only to save lives and prevent injuries. Why would we want to give up freedom just for to save lives and prevent injuries?

Sure, distraction and teen crashes is even worse than we thought but we can’t let the nanny state win.

The results showed that distraction was a factor in 58 percent of all crashes studied, including 89 percent of road-departure crashes and 76 percent of rear-end crashes. NHTSA previously has estimated that distraction is a factor in only 14 percent of all teen driver crashes.

Who knows what the nanny state would do next to try and save lives and protect people from harm?

Related: Nanny Staters Think the Government Should Protect People From FraudNanny State Wants Safe MedicineCitizens Don’t Need Nanny State Deciding What Food is Safe to EatSelf Driving Cars Have Huge Potential for Benefit to Society

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